Suggested itineraries in Umbria

This region comprises mainly hills, mountains, hollows and plains and extends along the Tiber’s central basin. At the heart of the boot, it is the only region with no coastline. It includes Lake Trasimeno, central Italy’s largest lake. The area still has the remains of Etruscan settlements, particularly around Castiglione del Lago, where the loveliness of the natural landscape combines with the romanticism and stillness of the lake. Moving on from the two lakes, we come to the Cascate delle Marmore waterfalls near Terni, some of the most beautiful in Europe. The waters dive into the River Nera with a spectacular 165 m (541 ft) drop, and are surrounded by lush vegetation. This is the spot for sports lovers who enjoy canoeing, kayaking, and not only. Umbria encompasses large part of the Monti Sibillini national park as well as seven regional parks: the park of Colfiorito, of Monte Cucco, Monte Subasio, the Tiber river park, the park of Monte Peglia and Selva di Meana, the park of Lago Trasimeno and the Nera river park. Each one has a different story to tell through its environmental and naturalistic features, the fascinating flora, fauna, streams and rivers, lakes and geological stratifications, the distinguishing aspects that are the essence of Umbrian parks, all of which are also home to historical and cultural remains linked to the great roads of the past.

Suggested itineraries in Tuscany

Situated in central-southern Tuscany, the Province of Siena extends over some of the most famous and fascinating Tuscan territories, e.g. the southern hills of Chianti, Val d’Elsa and Val di Merse, Val d'Arbia, Val di Chiana and Val d'Orcia, right up to the slopes of Mount Amiata.
The magnificent natural scenery of the Val d'Orcia that extends through the Tuscan hills was inserted onto the UNESCO World Heritage List in 2004. The images of Val d'Orcia, and particularly the reproductions of their landscapes, in which they depict citizens living in harmony with nature, became icons for the Renaissance Age. Gently-rolling hills covered in the dense vegetation of vineyards, olive groves, cypresses, beech and chestnut trees alternate with Medieval habitations, rural villas and castles boasting impervious towers – all of which is diffused in a tranquilly-isolated nature. This is the scenario that is laid out before the eyes of the visitor to Val d’Orcia – just as evocative in real life as it is when depicted by the Sienese Masters.